Community Cinema Joins the Online Conversation with Independent Lens

Community Cinema Social Composite of Events

It’s here – a brand new season of dynamic screening events with Community Cinema. This season, Community Cinema is proud to celebrate 10 years of uniting people through independent film. Available nationwide, Community Cinema presents free screenings and discussions about films from the Emmy Award-winning series Independent Lens. By igniting conversations around issues that affect us all, Community Cinema creates real and lasting change.

A new season of Community Cinema also means new ways of engaging with our audiences. We’re excited to announce that Community Cinema will soon be able to reach a wider audience through the Independent Lens social media space! As of November 1st, we’ll be closing the Community Cinema Facebook and Twitter accounts, and bringing you the latest in Community Cinema events and news via Independent Lens’s social accounts. With an expanded community, the Independent Lens Facebook and Twitter pages are the perfect spots to continue Community Cinema conversations online.

So, if you want to stay in the know on the latest Community Cinema event news and updates, make sure to follow Independent Lens on Facebook and Twitter.

Help make our 10th season the best one yet by adding your voice to the conversation. Join us at one of our local events; we’d love to see you there!

ITVS Wins 4 News & Documentary Emmy Awards

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Cover your ears, it’s horn tooting time here! Last night at the News & Documentary Emmy Awards ceremony, ITVS films won a total of 4 Emmys, including 3 for Independent Lens films [Independent Lens had been nominated for 10 News & Doc Emmys overall.] Read more on RealScreen, but without further ado, the winners are:

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ITVS Names Noland Walker as Senior Content Director

Noland WalkerIndependent Television Service is excited to announce that Peabody Award-winning documentary producer and director Noland Walker has been appointed Senior Content Director, where he will manage a portfolio of ITVS-funded programs, providing curatorial analysis and program development feedback to producers.

He will also co-curate the Emmy Award-winning Independent Lens series along with Deputy Executive Producer Lois Vossen and PBS, replacing the role of Claire Aguilar after 13 years of distinguished service in the position. In addition, Walker is responsible for identifying trends in the documentary and public media landscape, tracking current projects in the field, and providing recommendations for the funding of public television programming.

“We are thrilled that Noland will be joining ITVS,” said Jim Sommers, Senior Vice President of Content. “He brings a wealth of experience not only as an independent filmmaker but as a highly-respected editorial consultant and advisor for documentaries and transmedia projects. His deep knowledge of public media and commitment to the mission of ITVS are invaluable.”

Most recently, Walker worked with the Boston-based organization AIR, serving as Executive Editor of Localore, an innovative project designed to bring fresh talent, ideas and energy to public media through collaborative production partnerships between producers and local public radio and TV stations.

With over two decades of experience in the development and production of award-winning documentaries, Walker’s credits include two American Experience programs, Jonestown: The Life and Death of Peoples Temple (co-writer and co-producer) and Citizen King, which he produced, directed, and wrote with Orlando Bagwell; producer and co-writer for Boogie Man: The Lee Atwater Story (Frontline); writer for Sam Cooke: Crossing Over (American Masters); and co-producer of Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock (Independent Lens). He also produced and directed an episode of the Peabody and Emmy Award-winning Africans in America, a four-part WGBH series on slavery in the U.S.

Walker served as Creative Advisor during the first three years of the Sundance Institute’s New Frontiers Lab and continues to advise and consult Sundance Fellows on an ongoing basis at the Institute’s request. He serves a similar role for the Creative Lab at Canada’s Hot Docs Film Festival.

How “Oil & Water” Came Together

David Poritz (left) and Hugo Lucitante visit a Petroamanas oil field in Ecuador.

David Poritz (left) and Hugo Lucitante visit a Petroamanas oil field in Ecuador.

Ed. note: This guest post by the directors of the ITVS-funded documentary Oil & Water, which premieres Sunday, September 21st on the WORLD Channel [check local listings] as part of the Global Voices series, gives you some of the fascinating background behind this film. Oil & Water was also just featured on Boston’s NPR station WBUR as well [more here]. [Update: Oil & Water is now available to watch online via PBS until October 21, 2014.]


 

By Laurel Spellman Smith and Francine Strickwerda

A documentary filmmaker once said that when you choose an idea for a film, you need to date it a while, and make sure you can fall in love with it. Because you will be eating, drinking, and sleeping with it for a long time.  It made us laugh, because it’s so true. It’s also about how a human story can knock the wind out of you with its brilliance, and then how it will haunt and nag you until you have no choice but to make your film. That’s how we got to making Oil & Water, which we began filming in 2006.

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The Interrupters’ Ameena Matthew Battles Leukemia

Ameena in The Interrupters

Those of you who have seen the critically lauded documentary The Interrupters, an ITVS-funded film by Steve James (Hoop Dreams; Life Itself) that aired on PBS’s FRONTLINE last year, will be saddened to hear that its main subject, Ameena Matthews, is battling leukemia and lymphoma. While Ameena is no longer an employee of Ceasefire, the violence prevention organization featured in The Interrupters, she has been a vital part of Chicago’s efforts to help reduce its epidemic of gang warfare. Via our friends at Kartemquin Films, you can be proactive in lending a hand to Ameena’s fight by contributing to a campaign to cover her medical costs.

The Interrupters is also currently available to watch online for free via PBS Video.

Help Bring ITVS to SXSW!

Public voting for SXSW 2015 is officially underway. Check out ITVS’s three panel proposals and vote for your favorites – hurry, voting closes September 5th!

btb_panelpickerITVS is proud to be part of three proposed panel discussions for next year’s SXSW festival in Austin. Highlighting topics ranging from navigating the digital terrain to the ins and outs of webseries funding, ITVS is eager to share the insight of industry experts and veteran filmmakers. We may be biased but we think all three of our panels are very worthy of inclusion in SXSW programming and we could use your vote. So sign up and give us a thumb’s up!

First off we ask, “What’s the Value of Your Digital Rights?” In this panel, industry experts will provide insight into how much digital rights are worth to filmmakers and distributors launching titles on outlets such as iTunes, Amazon, and Netflix. Attendees will walk away from this session with insight into which platforms are winning in the battle for viewer attention, while attaining a greater understanding of the deal structures and windowing strategies negotiated as part of these licensing deals.

What sets PBS apart from all of the other broadcasters and distribution outlets? Why do award-winning filmmakers continue to choose PBS as the home for their films? Our second panel, “Doc Distribution: Get Up to Speed with PBS Indies,” highlights the benefits of distributing your film through public television. With access to 98% of American households and the opportunity to be a part of national engagement programs, public media is a great fit for producers looking to expand cultural awareness, spark dialogue, and evoke civil participation. Attendees will be able to hear directly from filmmakers who have chosen this distribution route and how it affected the reach, revenue, and impact of their project. Continue reading

Submit Your Film to Independent Lens!

Independent Lens is seeking film submissions of completed or near completed programs for broadcast during the October 2015 – June 2016 season.

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Independent Lens is the largest showcase for independent documentaries anywhere on U.S. television, premiering 22 new films each season. Airing Monday nights at 10pm on PBS, Independent Lens has presented more than 300 thought-provoking documentaries to public television audiences since premiering in 2003.

Independent Lens films are often character driven stories and are known for compelling storytelling, innovation, and diversity. The Emmy and Peabody Award-winning series welcomes individual expression and is committed to presenting diverse points of view, on topics suited for a national audience.

When selecting programs, Independent Lens considers a range of factors, including the quality of the filmmaking, the timeliness of the story, and audience appeal. Programs should offer a fresh perspective, especially if the topic has been explored on other PBS series.

To learn more about eligibility, what we are looking for, and to complete the online submission form go to www.ILsubmissions.org.

An Inside Look at ITVS’s Producer Orientation

As we begin reviewing applications for the second round of Open Call, we want to highlight the experience of a filmmaker who was selected in the previous round for funding. Filmmaker S. Leo Chiang’s documentary, Out Run, was one of eight projects recommended for funding through the initiative. Here he provides a firsthand account of his experience at our ITVS Producer Orientation.

Filmmaker S. Leo Chiang

Filmmaker S. Leo Chiang

It is 9am on a Wednesday morning. Deep in ITVS’s San Francisco headquarters, a roomful of staff members and ITVS-funded producers are staring intently at a projector screen in a darkened room so they can… sing along to Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance with Somebody” music video. At the top of their lungs. Under a glittering disco ball.

Say what?

Welcome to ITVS Open Call Orientation!

For an independent documentary producer, few moments are more thrilling than getting that email from ITVS… you know, the one with the word “congratulations” somewhere in the first paragraph. Open Call funding support means that I, as a filmmaker, can now focus on actually making my film without expending more time on the laborious process of fundraising for a production. My film partner Johnny Symons and I have been working on Out Run, a documentary about the only LGBT political party in the world fighting to elect a transgender woman to the Philippine Congress. Needless to say, when we saw the coveted email in our inboxes inviting our project for Open Call co-production funding, we were beside ourselves. The first order of business after receiving the fantastic news? Attending ITVS Orientation. Continue reading

Around the World in Many Ways with Global Voices

By Misa Oyama, ITVS Staff

The narrative film Boyhood has provoked significant interest for following the growth of the same actor as he ages in real time. While the approach is unique in feature films, this method is an everyday reality for a documentary filmmaker – as is demonstrated by this season of Global Voices.

Richard Linklater’s new film Boyhood has provoked a lot of interest in its intriguing premise and the background of its production: follow the growth of a character over twelve years, not with different actors, but with the same person as he ages in real time. This is the first time that a narrative film has had the patience to tackle the kind of project well-known in the documentary world. Most notably, Michael Apted’s Up series follows the same people over the course of a lifetime, beginning with a group of 7-year-old British schoolchildren in 1964 and revisiting them every seven years; the most recent installment explores their lives at the age of 56. Filming over a span of years gives audiences a true sense of the passing of time.

Like these films, three documentaries in this summer’s Global Voices series approach the subject of growth and aging, despite vastly different cultural contexts. Each one explores a significant period in a person’s life, from young adulthood to middle age to the final years. You can see a lifetime in My So-Called EnemyMy Perestroika [both available to watch online], and Here Comes Uncle Joe [airing on the WORLD Channel August 31st]. Continue reading

Everything You Need to Know to Apply to Open Call

Over the past month, ITVS’s Programming Department hosted a number of informative webinars in order to arm filmmakers with the information needed to successfully apply for Open Call funding. With Friday’s deadline fast approaching, we wanted to offer this brief overview of each of the events, which covered everything from writing the ITVS treatment to what makes a successful work-in-progress sample. Check it out and be sure to apply to Open Call by Friday, August 8th.

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On July 10th, Programming Manager N’Jeri Eaton hosted the “Writing the ITVS Treatment” webinar. View the archived webinar below:

Treatment Webinar from ITVS_VIDEO on Vimeo.

On July 24th, an OVEE screening was held to review work-in-progress samples and to discuss the process with filmmakers who were successful with their submissions. To find out what makes a good work sample, read the transcript from the “Work-in-Progresses That Work” webinar here. Continue reading